Problems Facing Students of High Institution of Learning and their Solution

Problems Facing Students of High Institution of Learning and their Solution

Education for charge in the developing countries, particularly in African, has never been as critical as it is today. Besides the perennial issues of relevance. Inadequate of resources,  explosion in enrolment and demand for access, Africa Education confront the challenge of the knowledge revolution and  globalization, phenomena fueled by the rapid advances in knowledge, most of which is produced outside.

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These are matters in respect of which higher education, as the principal venue for knowledge creation and dissemination, occupies a very special place.  Additionally, higher education has the function of fostering the capacity of individuals and communities to embrace democratic principles, to uphold human rights and to promote sustainable development for these and other reasons, higher education must receive the cost urgent and thoughtful attention from Africa government and the region. When the association of Africa university (AAU) was established in 1967, its membership was only 34. today, the association has grown into a body of more than 170 universities, drawn from 43 countries. The association provides a platform for reflection, consultation, debate co-operation and collaboration on issues and projects of interest and benefit to its membership and to Africa development. Over the years, this was contributed to the enhancement of the capacity of African university for teaching, research and service to their communities and nations. It has also facilitated a constant review of their performance and role in the socio-economic and political development of their individual nations and of the African continent as a whole.

In the last quarter of  the 20th century, higher education in Africa experienced serious set books. Higher education institutions suffered neglect as a result of reduced resources in most African  countries and low priority given to it by African governments. Under finding, the deteriorates of basic academic and  research infrastructure, unsatisfactory terms and conditions of services for university staff and the problems have not only adversity affected the quality of higher education provided by the universities but have also had a negative affect on the overall development of Africa countries.

Thirty four years offer the establishment of the AUU three years after the Dakar “Declaration and action plan on higher education in Africa” two years offer the world declaration on higher education for the 21st century” and at the beginning of the third millennium, African universities had the opportunity to examine the emerging extracts in higher education, especially the impact the  of information and communication technologies.  They have reflected on the problems of their institutions, with a view to enhancing their contribution to the socio-economic development of the continent. The star of third millennium provides African universities and the AAU an opportunity for referring their vision, mission and students and other stakeholders in the development of universities in African. Declaration in  consideration of the above, WE, REPRESENTATIVES OF AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES, ON THE OCCASION OF THE 10TH  GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE ASSOCIATION OF AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES, meeting in Nairobi, Kenya on 9th February  2001, cal for the revitalization of the African University and for a revealed sense of urgency in acknowledging the crucial rolist should play in solving the many problems facing our continent, and MAKE AND ANNOUNCE AFRICA AND THE WORLD, THIS DECLARATION ON THE AFRICAN UNIVERSITY IN THE THIRD MILLENNIUM-in order that Africa universities should be in a position to fulfill their mission and fundamental obligation to the people of Africa and the world community:

SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT WITH THE SUBJECT AREA.

The (AUT) campaigns for universities and the research councils to reduce the use of fixed term contracts a higher education.

Alongside this, we urge universities to implement recommendation 56 of the Bett report (1999) which calls  for greater investment of time and resources in the training and development of all groups staff particularly for part time staff and those on fixed term, contracts.

  STAFF SHORTAGES AND THE IMPACT ON STUDENT

Recruiting and retaining high quality staff is becoming a growing problem  in  higher education. The Bett report found there were particular difficulties in business subjects, information technology, electronic engineering, accountancy, law and some rarer specialists.

A quantitative survey, by the office of manpower economic, of 170 he is in October 1999, found that recruitment and retention difficulties had increased since the Bett study in addition in depth qualitative case studies, conducted by industrial relations services, in 13 diverse HEIS during 1999 found that all is institutions were experiencing recruitment problems in specific academic specialists and support functions, particularly in subject areas crucial to the knowledge driven economy.

THE SCHOOL OF THOUGH RELEVANT TO THE PROBLEMS OF STUDY

The scale of the problem:        According to the latest figure (1997-98) the rate of Eastage or non completion in Uk higher education is 17%. Eight three percent completion rate, how ever, are better than most other OECD countries for example France (55%) German (72%) and the UDA (64%) through lower than Japan higher education early has remained more or less constant over the last decade, there is no room for complacency.

DIFFERENT METHOD OF STUDYING THE PROBLEM

1.       STUDENT DEBT AND HARDSHIP:

Financial hardship, levels of debt and the need for students to undertake long hours of employment in term time are major elements in decisions to withdraw from university. Research shows that students from low income groups are far more likely to withdraw because of financial difficulties than students from more privileged back grounds. Financial problems have been exacerbated by the removal of the maintenance grant and the introduction of tuition fees. These developments have led to an increased reliance on paid work during term time, which can interfere with academic study and timetables. AUT members increasingly comment on the difficulties experienced by students who are forced to work long hours in part time jobs in order to make ends meet, and who as  a consequence, fall behind in their academic work and perform below their abilities. Such factors can feed into a student’s decision to discontinue his or her studies.

II.      STUDENT SUPPORT:

The staff role supporting students throughout their academic careers is also important in ensuring that they complete their studies. Apart from advice provided by Nus and university welfare services students often rely on academic staff as a source of informal support. Students from non-traditional backgrounds are often in greater need of support and guidance than middle class s student. How ever, the informal support role of academic and  academic staff is being undermined by current inadequacies in finding, pay and conditions

III.    STUDENT STAFF RATIOS

A key problem is rising student. Staff ratio student numbers have expanded dramatically in the past. Three  or four decades.  In the early 1960s, only one young person in twenty entered fall time higher education. By 1997-98  the figure had risen to one in three (34%) for  the UK as a whole and around 45% in Scott and Northern Ireland. However, the increased in academic and academic related staff  has not kept face. Between 1980 and 1999 the student academic staff ratio (SSR) virtually doubled from 9:1 to 17:1 in the UK (in the USA it is 14:1 and Japan it is 13: at the same time, public finding per student has been cut by more than 30%.

The consequences of this under funded expansion are:

a.       Large class Lecture size with a sharp decrease in small group teaching and in opportunities to provide support to individual student.

b.       Reductions in laboratory and other practical work because of cost cutting or pressure on facilities;

c.       Lack of adequate student access to libraries and computing facilities; and

D.      Lecturers having difficulties in finding time with intensive work loads to pursue their own professional development;

SUMMARY:

Retention problems and solution, in recent years AUT members have expressed the view that the student experience has suffered from the under-fonder expansion of higher education and from increased financial hard scrip. One of the specific problems to emerge is  the significant their of students who are failing to complete their studies. This is reflected in the select committee’s report on student retention in higher education.

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This article was extracted from a Project Research Work Topic

PROBLEMS FACING STUDENTS OF HIGH INSTITUTION OF LEARNING AND THEIR SOLUTION. (A CASE STUDY OF ABSU)

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